Bed and Breakfast at Mexico City

Colonial Era of México City

The city had been the capital of the Aztec empire and in the colonial era, Mexico City became the capital of New Spain. The viceroy of Mexico or vice-king lived in the viceregal palace on the main square or Zócalo. The Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral, the seat of the Archbishopric of New Spain, was constructed on another side of the Zócalo, as was the archbishop’s palace, and across from it the building housing the city council or ayuntamiento of the city.

MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
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A late seventeenth-century painting of the Zócalo by Cristóbal de Villalpando depicts the main square, which had been the old Aztec ceremonial center. The existing central place of the Aztecs was effectively and permanently transformed to the ceremonial center and seat of power during the colonial period, and remains to this day in modern Mexico, the central place of the nation.

The rebuilding of the city after the siege of Tenochtitlan was accomplished by the abundant indigenous labor in the surrounding area. Franciscan friar Toribio de Benavente Motolinia, one of the Twelve Apostles of Mexico who arrived in New Spain in 1524, described the rebuilding of the city as one of the afflictions or plagues of the early period:

The seventh plague was the construction of the great City of Mexico, which, during the early years used more people than in the construction of Jerusalem. The crowds of laborers were so numerous that one could hardly move in the streets and causeways, although they are very wide. Many died from being crushed by beams, or falling from high places, or in tearing down old buildings for new ones.

Fray Toribio de Benavente

Franciscan Friar

Preconquest Tenochtitlan was built in the center of the inland lake system, with the city reachable by canoe and by wide causeways to the mainland. The causeways were rebuilt under Spanish rule with indigenous labor.

Colonial Spanish cities were constructed on a grid pattern, if no geographical obstacle prevented it. In Mexico City, the Zócalo (main square) was the central place from which the grid was then built outward. The Spanish lived in the area closest to the main square in what was known as the traza, in orderly, well laid-out streets. Indian residences were outside that exclusive zone and houses were haphazardly located.

Spaniards sought to keep Indians separate from Spaniards but since the Zócalo was a center of commerce for Indians, they were a constant presence in the central area, so strict segregation was never enforced. At intervals Zócalo was where major celebrations took place as well as executions. It was also the site of two major riots in the seventeenth century, one in 1624, the other in 1692.

Examples of colonial buildings at Mexico City. Clockwise, from upper left: San Ildefonso College (b. 1749); Casa de los Azulejos (b. 1737); Convent of San Francisco (b. 1710–1716); Chapel of la Concepción Cuepopan (b. 18th c.); La Profesa Church (b. 1597–1805); Palace of the Inquisition (b. 1732–1736)

The city grew as the population did, coming up against the lake’s waters. As the depth of the lake water fluctuated, Mexico City was subject to periodic flooding. A major labor draft, the desagüe, compelled thousands of Indians over the colonial period to work on infrastructure to prevent flooding. Floods were not only an inconvenience but also a health hazard, since during flood periods human waste polluted the city’s streets. By draining the area, the mosquito population dropped as did the frequency of the diseases they spread. However, draining the wetlands also changed the habitat for fish and birds and the areas accessible for Indian cultivation close to the capital.