Bed and Breakfast at Mexico City

Colonial Era of México City II

The 16th century saw a proliferation of churches, many of which can still be seen today in the historic center. Economically, Mexico City prospered as a result of trade. Unlike Brazil or Peru, Mexico had easy contact with both the Atlantic and Pacific worlds. Although the Spanish crown tried to completely regulate all commerce in the city, it had only partial success.

MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
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The concept of nobility flourished in New Spain in a way not seen in other parts of the Americas. Spaniards encountered a society in which the concept of nobility mirrored that of their own. Spaniards respected the indigenous order of nobility and added to it. In the ensuing centuries, possession of a noble title in Mexico did not mean one exercised great political power, for one’s power was limited even if the accumulation of wealth was not. 

The concept of nobility in Mexico was not political but rather a very conservative Spanish social one, based on proving the worthiness of the family. Most of these families proved their worth by making fortunes in New Spain outside of the city itself, then spending the revenues in the capital, building churches, supporting charities and building extravagant palatial homes. The craze to build the most opulent residence possible reached its height in the last half of the 18th century. Many of these palaces can still be seen today, leading to Mexico City’s nickname of “The city of palaces” given by Alexander Von Humboldt.

The Grito de Dolores (“Cry of Dolores”), also known as El Grito de la Independencia (“Cry of Independence”), marked the beginning of the Mexican War of Independence. The Battle of Guanajuato, the first major engagement of the insurgency, occurred four days later. After a decade of war, Mexico’s independence from Spain was effectively declared in the Declaration of Independence of the Mexican Empire on 27 September 1821.[50] Agustín de Iturbide is proclaimed Emperor of the First Mexican Empire by Congress, crowned in the Cathedral of Mexico. Unrest followed for the next several decades, as different factions fought for control of Mexico.[51]

The Mexican Federal District was established by the new government and by the signing of their new constitution, where the concept of a federal district was adapted from the United States Constitution. Before this designation, Mexico City had served as the seat of government for both the State of Mexico and the nation as a whole. Texcoco de Mora and then Toluca became the capital of the State of Mexico.