Bed and Breakfast at Mexico City

History of México City

The oldest signs of human occupation in the area of Mexico City are those of the “Peñon woman” and others found in San Bartolo Atepehuacan (Gustavo A. Madero). They were believed to correspond to the lower Cenolithic period (9500–7000 BC). However, recent studies place the age of the Penon woman at 12,700 years old, making her one of the Americas’ oldest human remains. Its origin due to its mitochondrial DNA suggests Asian, or Caucasian having an appearance like Western European whites, or Australian.

MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
MEXSUITES CASA AZUL B&B MEXICO CITY
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The area was the destination of the migrations of the Teochichimecas during the 8th and 13th centuries, peoples that would give rise to the Toltec, and Mexica (Aztecs) cultures. The latter arrived around the 14th century to settle first on the shores of the lake. The city of Mexico-Tenochtitla was founded by the Mexica people in 1325.

The old Mexica city that is now simply referred to as Tenochtitlan was built on an island in the center of the inland lake system of the Valley of Mexico, which it shared with a smaller city-state called Tlatelolco. According to legend, the Mexicas’ principal god, Huitzilopochtli, indicated the site where they were to build their home by presenting a golden eagle perched on a prickly pear devouring a rattlesnake.

Between 1325 and 1521, Tenochtitlan grew in size and strength, eventually dominating the other city-states around Lake Texcoco and in the Valley of Mexico. When the Spaniards arrived, the Aztec Empire had reached much of Mesoamerica, touching both the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean.

After landing in Veracruz, Spanish explorer Hernán Cortés advanced upon Tenochtitlan with the aid of many of the other native peoples, arriving there on 8 November 1519. Cortés and his men marched along the causeway leading into the city from Iztapalapa, and the city’s ruler, Moctezuma II, greeted the Spaniards; they exchanged gifts, but the camaraderie did not last long. Cortés put Moctezuma under house arrest, hoping to rule through him.

Tensions increased until, on the night of 30 June 1520 – during a struggle known as “La Noche Triste” – the Aztecs rose up against the Spanish intrusion and managed to capture or drive out the Europeans and their Tlaxcalan allies. Cortés regrouped at Tlaxcala. The Aztecs thought the Spaniards were permanently gone, and they elected a new king, Cuitláhuac, but he soon died; the next king was Cuauhtémoc.

Cortés began a siege of Tenochtitlan in May 1521. For three months, the city suffered from the lack of food and water as well as the spread of smallpox brought by the Europeans. Cortés and his allies landed their forces in the south of the island and slowly fought their way through the city. Cuauhtémoc surrendered in August 1521. The Spaniards practically razed Tenochtitlan during the final siege of the conquest.

Cortés first settled in Coyoacán, but decided to rebuild the Aztec site to erase all traces of the old order. He did not establish a territory under his own personal rule, but remained loyal to the Spanish crown. The first Spanish viceroy arrived in Mexico City fourteen years later. By that time, the city had again become a city-state, having power that extended far beyond its borders.

Although the Spanish preserved Tenochtitlan’s basic layout, they built Catholic churches over the old Aztec temples and claimed the imperial palaces for themselves. Tenochtitlan was renamed “Mexico” because the Spanish found the word easier to pronounce.